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List of Butterfly Garden Flowers & Plants for the Southeast Region

Southeast Region

This butterfly garden resource provides a complete list of butterflies found in the Southeast region of the United States, along with their preferred nectar flowers and the host plants they look for to lay eggs that the butterfly caterpillars can feed on. For advice on starting a butterfly garden, see our guide, How to Make a Butterfly Garden

The Southeast region includes the states of: Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia.
PhotoButterflyNectar PlantsHost Plants
Brush-footed Butterflies (Family Nymphalidae)

Photo: Bill Bouton
Florida Purplewing (Eunica tatila)decaying fruit, and nectar from lantana and cordiaunknown

Photo: Matthieu Gauvain
Red- spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis)butterfly bush, lantana, and milkweedbirches, aspen tree, and willow

Photo: Piccolo Namek
Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)aster, butterfly bush, and milkweedaspen tree and willow

Photo: US Fish and Wildlife
Hackberry Emperor (Asterocampa celtis)Sap, rotting fruit, dung, carrion, and will take moisture at wet spotshackberry and sugarberry

Photo: Kevin D Arvin
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)tree sap, rotting fruit, dung, carrion, and almost never visit flowerselm trees

Photo: Bill Bouton
Goatweed Leafwing (Anaea andria)goatweed, Texas croton, and prairie teasap, rotting fruit, dung, and bird droppings

Photo: Tall Timbers
Florida Leafwing (Anaea troglodyta floridalis)rotting fruit and dungwoolly croton

Photo: Sturm Ken
Aphrodite Fritillary (Speyeria aphrodite)milkweed and viper's buglossnorthern downy violet and lance-leaved violet

Photo: Megan McCarty
Diana (Speyeria diana)common and swamp milkweeds, ironweed, red clover, and butterflybushviolets

Photo: Liz West
Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele)Ohio buckeye, privets, black-eyed Susan, milkweed, blood flower, passion flowers, lantana, and tall verbenaviolets

Photo: Calibas
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)blazing stars, butterfly bush, lantana, zinnia, salviapassionvines and passion flowers

Photo: Anne Toal
Julia Heliconian (Dryas julia)lantana and shepherd's needlepassionvines and passiflora lutea

Photo: Bill Rhodes
Variegated Fritillary (Euptoieta claudia)butterflyweed, common milkweed, dogbane, peppermint, red clover, swamp milkweed, and tickseed sunflowermaypops, may apple, violets, purslane, stonecrop, and moonseed 

Photo: Arpingstone
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonius)lantana and shepherd's needlepassionvine

Photo: Queerbubbles
Banded Orange Heliconian (Dryadula phaetusa)flower nectarpassionvine

Photo: Didier Descouens
Tiger Mimic-Queen (Lycorea cleobaea)bird droppingspapaya, fig, bloodflower, and jacartia

Photo: Brian Wood
Monarch (Danaus plexippus)Dame's rocket, butterfly bush, blazing stars, milkweed, lantana, salvia, blood flower, zinnia, and coreopsismilkweed, scarlet milkweed, and blood flower

Photo: Cary Bass
Queen (Danaus gilippus)climbing milkweed, butterfly bush, lantana, zinnia, and blood flowermilkweed, scarlet milkweed, and blood flower

Photo: Bruce Marlin
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)aster, black-eyed Susan, flowering dogwood, dogbane, and goldenrodhackberry and sugarberry

Photo: Didier Descouens
Green Comma (Polygonia faunus)dung and carrionsmall pussy willow, black birch, alder, western azalea, and gooseberry

Photo: Ken Thomas
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)privets, Dame's rocket, aster, milkweed, marigold, verbena, Joe-Pye weed, goldenrod, zinnia, and dogbaneeverlastings, daisy family, mallow, ironweed, sunflower

Photo: Alison Hunter
Baltimore (Euphydryas phaeton)milkweed, viburnum, and wild roseturtlehead, hairy beardtongue, English plantain, false foxglove, arrowwood, common lousewort, Japanese honeysuckle, and white ash

Photo: Anne Toal
Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)aster, coreopsis, swamp milkweed, and verbenasnapdragon, verbena, ruellia, swamp verbena, plantain family

Photo: D Gordon E Robertson
Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma)rotting fruit and tree sapelm and nettle families including American elm, hops, nettle, false nettle, and wood nettle

Photo: Colorado State University
Gorgone Checkerspot (Chlosyne gorgone)nectar, especially from yellow flowerssunflower and crosswort

Photo: Voker Vaeth
Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)overripe fruit, tree sap, milkweed, dogbane, butterfly bush, zinnia, and lemonelm, aspen, hackberry, birch, and willow

Photo: Kabir Bakie
Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)aster, blazing stars, butterfly bush, buttonbush, milkweed, verbena, and zinniahollyhock, shasta daisy, sunflower, and mallow

Photo: Benny Mazur
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)dogbane, swamp milkweed, shepherd's needle, asters, and winter cresssmooth-leaved true asters

Photo: Anne Toal
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)lippia and shepherd's needledogfruit and mat grass

Photo: Derek Ramsey
Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis)rotting fruit, tree sap, dung, and carrion; will visit flowers, such as common milkweed, aster, and sweet pepperbush, when these are unavailableAmerican elm, red elm, hackberry, Japanese hop, nettle, and false nettle

Photo: Luc Viatour
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)aster, butterfly bush, milkweed, Ohio buckeye, and shasta daisyfalse nettle

Photo: Megan McCarty
Silvery Checkerspot (Chlosyne nycteis)red clover, common milkweed, and dogbaneblack-eyed Susan, sunflowers, and wingstem

Photo: Tall Timbers
Texas Crescent (Phyciodes texana)flower nectarlow plants of the acanthus family: ruellia, jacobina, Bloperone, and Siphonoglossa.

Photo: D Gordon E Rboertson
Compton Tortoiseshell (Nymphalis vaualbum)sap, rotting fruit, and nectar of willow flowersaspen, cottonwood, willows, gray birch, and paper birch

Photo: Anne Toal
Cuban Crescent (Anthanassa frisia)flower nectarshrimpflower in the acanthus family

Photo: D Gordon E Robertson
Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma)rotting fruit and tree sapAmerican elm, hops, nettle, false nettle, and wood nettle

Photo: Notafly
Malachite (Siproeta stelenes)rotting fruit, bird droppings, lianas, trees, and sometimes herbaceous plantscafetin, green shrimp plant, wild petunia, and ruellia

Photo: Cloviz
Mangrove Buckeye (Junonia genoveva)flower nectarblack-mangrove

Photo: Eric Haley
Little Metalmark (Calephelis virginiensis)short-flowered composites: yarrow, lance-leaved coreopsis, fine-leaved sneezeweed, and blue mist floweryellow thistle

Photo: Didier Descouens
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)cordia and caseariawater hyssop, ruellia, and lippia

Photo: Benny Mazur
Harvester (Feniseca tarquinius)aphid honeydew; they don't sip flower nectarwoolly aphids and sometimes scale insects or treehoppers (these insects suck sap from alders, witch hazel, ash, beech, hawthorn, and wild currant)

Photo: Anne Toal
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)sap and rotting fruitcarpet grass, centipede grass, St. Augustine grass, and Kentucky bluegrass

Photo: D Gordon E Robertson
Common Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala)rotting fruit and flower nectarpurpletop and other grasses

Photo: D Gordon E Robertson
Little Wood-Satyr (Megisto cymela)sap, aphid honeydew, and rarely flower nectarorchard grass and centipede grass 

Photo: Megan McCarty
Northern Pearly-eye (Enodia anthedon)Dung, fungi, carrion, and sap from willows, poplars, and birch.grasses: white grass, bearded shorthusk, plumegrass, broadleaf uniola, and bottlebrush 
Parnassians and Swallowtail Butterflies (Papilionidae)

Photo: Antonia Machado
Polydamas Swallowtail (Battus polydamas)lantana, honeysuckle, and soapweedpipevine

Photo: Mongo
Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)butterfly bush, milkweed, red clover, and thistledill, fennel, parsley, and rue

Photo: Derek Ramsey
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)Asiatic lilies, privets, azaleas, autumn olive, wild cherry, lilac, milkweed, zinnia, apples, Ohio buckeye, and Joe-Pye weedwild cherry, sweetbay, basswood, tulip tree, birch, ash, cottonwood, mountain ash, and willow

Photo: Mongo
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)lantana, azalea, bougainvilla, bouncing Bet, dame's rocket, goldenrod, Japanese honeysuckle, and swamp milkweedtrees and herbs of the citrus family: prickly ash, hop tree, wild lime, and common rue

Photo: Leppyone
Palamedes Swallowtail (Papilio palamedes)sweet pepperbush, thistles, blue flag, and azalealaurel family,  especially redbay

Photo: Kaldari
Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)butterfly bush, lantana, swamp milkweed, mexican sunflowers, verbena, and petuniapipevines, especially Dutchman's pipe

Photo: Megan McCarty
Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus)daylilies, Japanese honeysuckle, jewelweed, thistles, milkweed, azalea, dogbane, lantana, mimosa, zinnia, and sweet pepperbushspicebush, sassafras trees, prickly ash, tulip tree, sweetbay, camphor, and redbay

Photo: Megan McCarty
Zebra Swallowtail (Eurytides marcellus)moisture from sand and autumn olive, Ohio buckeye, blueberry, blackberry, lilac, redbud, viper's bugloss, verbena, dogbane, and common milkweedshrubs of the genus Asimina and passion flower

Photo: Notafly
Bahaman Swallowtail (Papilio andraemon)unknowncitrus, ruta, and zanthoxylum species

Photo: Victor W Fazio
Hayhurst's Scallopwing (Staphylus hayhurstii)marigold, knotweed, spearmint, wild marjoram, cucumber, dogbane, white sweet clover, and white cloverlambsquarters and chaff flower
Skippers Butterflies (Family Hesperiidae)

Photo: Brocken Inaglory
Common Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus communis)white-flowered composites: shepherd's needles, fleabane, and asters; also French marigold, oregano, sedum "autumn joy," red clover, knapweed, and beggar's ticksmallow family: globemallows, mallow, hollyhock, alkali mallows, velvet-leaf, and poppy mallow ticks 

Photo: Vitaly Charny
Golden Banded-Skipper (Autochton cellus)trailing arbutus, blackberry, abelia, and hollyhockNew Mexico locust and hog peanut 

Photo: Jon Zander
Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus) > bougainvillea, lantana, and shepherd's needleVine legumes including various beans, hog peanuts, beggar's ticks, blue peas, and wisteria

Photo: Korall
Mangrove Skipper (Phocides pigmalion)mangrove, shepherd's needle, citrus, and bougainvillaea flowersAmerican mangrove

Photo: Derek Ramsey
Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)favors blue, red, pink, purple, and sometimes white and cream-colored ones: Ohio buckeye, blueberry, everlasting pea, common milkweed, red clover, buttonbush, blazing star, thistles, and sedum "autumn joy." Sometimes French marigold and oreganoherbacious and woody legumes: black locust, honey locust, and false indigo

Photo: Mike Boone
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)mallows: axocatzin, mallow, hollyhock, velvet-leaf, and malva locasidas and small-flowered composites such as shepherd's needles

Photo : Eugene Zelenko
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)flower nectarmallows: globemallows, velvet-leaf, and poppy mallow

Photo: Leppyone
Brazilian Skipper (Calpodes ethlius)lantana and nectar from large white or pale yellow flowers of woody lianas, trees, and shrubsvarious cultivated plants in the canna family

Photo: Dendroica Cerulea
Broad-winged Skipper (Poanes viator)Inland populations sip nectar from swamp milkweed, purple loosestrife, and blue vervain. Coastal populations use nectar from dogbane, swamp milkweed, pickerelweed, thistles, salt marsh fleabane, and others.Inland populations feed on hairy sedge; coastal populations feed on reed, wild rice, and marsh millet

Photo: Dendroica Cerulea
Crossline Skipper (Polites origenes)white, pink, or purple flowers: purple vetch, red clover, selfheal, dogbane, shrub houstonia, New Jersey tea, and New York ironweedpurpletop, little bluestem, and other grasses

Photo: D Gordon E Robertson
Delaware Skipper (Anatrytone logan)pink and white flowers: swamp and common milkweeds, shrub houstonia, mountain mint, marsh fleabane, sweet pepperbush, buttonbush, thistles, and pickerelweedbig bluestem, switchgrass, and wooly beard grass

Photo: Tom Peterson
Dion Skipper (Euphyes dion)pickerelweed, sneezeweed, buttonbush, Alsike cloversedges: woolgrass, hairy sedge, and shoreline sedge

Photo: Dendroica Cerulea
Dun Skipper (Euphyes vestris)white, pink, or purple flowers: common milkweed, purple vetch, selfheal, peppermint, dogbane, and viper's buglosschufa flatsedge and sun sedge

Photo: Anne Toal
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)croton, alfalfa, composites, lippia, and others.Johnson grass, Bermuda grass, and sugarcane

Photo: Calibas
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)aster, ironweed, verbena, milkweed, woodland stonecropgrasses, sedges, especially bermuda grass

Photo: D Gordon E Robertson
Least Skipper (Ancyloxypha numitor)low growing plants such as wood sorrel, swamp verbena, pickerelweed, chickory, and white clover.grasses: marsh millet, rice cutgrass, and cultivated rice

Photo: Dendroica Cerulea
Peck's Skipper (Polites peckius)red clover, purple vetch, thistles, selfheal, New York ironweed, blue vervain, common milkweed, swamp milkweed, dogbane, and New Jersey tearice cutgrass and bluegrass

Photo: Megan McCarty
Tawny-edged Skipper (Polites themistocles)alfalfa, red clover, dogbane, shrub houstonia, purple coneflower, thistles, and chicory.panic grasses, slender crabgrass, and bluegrass

Photo: Anne Toal
Common Sootywing (Pholisora catullus)ogbane, marjoram, oxalis, white clover, common milkweed, peppermint, cucumber, and melonlambsquarters, amaranths, and cockscomb 

Photo: Mary Keim
Confusing Cloudywing (Thorybes confusis)flower nectarbush clover (Lespedeza) in the pea family

Photo: D Gordon E Robertson
Dreamy Duskywing (Erynnis icelus)ground ivy, blueberry, wild strawberry, blackberry, Labrador tea, dogbane, New Jersey tea, winter cress, purple vetch, and lupinewillows, poplars, aspens, and occasionally birch

Photo: USDA Agricultural Research
Hoary Edge (Achalarus lyciades)common milkweed, dogbane, buttonbush, and Japanese honeysucklebeggar's ticks, false indigo, and bush clover

Photo: Mike Boone
Horace's Duskywing (Erynnis horatius)ground ivy, dogbane, buttonbush, sneezeweed, goldenrod, peppermint, boneset, and winter cressred and white oaks: willow oak, northern red oak, scrub oak, water oak, post oak, and live oak 

Photo: Dger
Juvenal's Duskywing (Erynnis juvenalis)ground ivy, winter cress, dandelion, wild plum, wisteria, blueberry, Carolina vetch, redbud, and lilacrree and shrub oaks

Photo: Bruce Marlin
Little Glassywing (Pompeius verna)white, pink, and purple flowers are preferred, including dogbane, selfheal, peppermint, joe-pye weed, and common and swamp milkweedspurpletop

Photo: Harvard College
Mottled Duskywing (Erynnis martialis)ground ivy, bush houstonia, gromwell, and hoary vervainwild lilacs: New Jersey tea and redroot

Photo: Aaron Gunnary
Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades)blue, purple, pink, or white flowers: dogbane, selfheal, crown vetch, Japanese honeysuckle, thistles, common milkweed, Deptford pink, and hoary vervainlegumes, plants in pea family: beggar's ticks, bush clover, clover, lotus 

Photo: Ken Thomas
Sachem (Atalopedes campestris)swamp and common milkweeds, buttonbush, dogbane, peppermint, red clover, tickseed sunflower, thistles, marigold, and astersBermuda grass, crabgrass, St. Augustine grass, and goosegrass

Photo: Cody Hough
Sleepy Duskywing (Erynnis brizo)heaths (Ericaceae) including wild azalea and blueberry; also blackberry, ground ivy, and dandelionscrub oak and other shrubby oaks

Photo: Megan McCarty
Southern Cloudywing (Thorybes bathyllus)nectar from blue, purple, pink, or white flowers including dogbane, selfheal, crown vetch, Japanese honeysuckle, thistles, and common milkweedbeggar's ticks, bush clover, clover, milkvetch, fuzzybean, and wild bean 

Photo: Tom Peterson
Wild Indigo Duskywing (Erynnis baptisiae)ground ivy, blackberry, white sweet clover, dogbane, sunflower, and crimson cloverwild indigo, wild blue indigo, lupine, false lupine, and crown vetch

Photo: Harvard College
Zarucco Duskywing (Erynnis zarucco)ground ivy and shepherd's needleherbaceous legumes: black locust, hairy bush clover, Colorado River hemp , and Sesbania longifolia

Photo: Anne Toal
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)shepherd's needle and lantanaBermuda grass , St. Augustine grass, and thin paspalum 

Photo: Charles T and John R Bryson
Northern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia egeremet)white, pink, or purple flowers: dogbane, red clover, sweet pepperbush, New Jersey tea, prairie blazingstar, purple coneflowerpanic grasses

Photo: Charles T and John R Bryson
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)pickerelweed, selfheal, and sweet pepperbushpaspalum and St. Augustine grass 

Photo: Dean Jue
Cofaqui Giant-Skipper (Megathymus cofaqui)adults don't feed; but males sip moisture from mudbear grass, Spanish bayonet, and Small's yucca

Photo: Charles T and John R Bryson
Yucca Giant-Skipper (Megathymus yuccae)adults don't feed; but males sip moisture from mudyuccas: bear grass, Small's yucca, Spanish dagger, and Spanish bayonet
Gossamer-wing Butterflies (Family Lycaenidae)

Photo: US Fish and Wildlife
American Copper (Lycaena phlaeas)showy goldenrod, gray goldenrod, buttercup, white clover, butterflyweed, yarrow, ox-eye daisyherbs of the buckwheat family: sheep sorrel, curled dock, and Oxyria digyna

Photo: Queerbubbles
Atala (Eumaeus atala)lantana, periwinkle, shepherd's needle, and wild coffeecoontie

Photo: Megan McCarty
Banded Hairstreak (Satyrium calanus)dogbane and common milkweed (preferred), chinquapin, small-flowered dogwood, New Jersey tea, meadowsweet, staghorn sumac, white sweet clover, and yarrow.oak, walnut, and hickory

Photo: Benny Mazur
Coral Hairstreak (Satyrium titus)butterflyweed, dogbane, and sulphur flowerwild cherry, wild plum, and chokecherry

Photo: Mike Ostrowski
Eastern Pine Elfin (Callophrys niphon)blueberry, cinquefoil, chickweed, common milkweed, and white sweet clovervarious hard pines: scrub pine, jack pine, and soft white pine

Photo: Anne Toal
Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus)desert broom, goldenrod, Hercules club, shepherd's needle, sweet pepperbush, and wild plummistletoes

Photo: US Fish and Wildlife
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)milkweed, blood flower, goldenrod, and Queen Anne's lacelegumes, hollyhock, passion flowers, and mallow

Photo: Megan McCarty
Henry's Elfin (Callophrys henrici)willows, wild plum and hawthorn, Forstiera, and redbuddahoon, American holly, and yaupon in Florida and North Carolina, redbud, huckleberries, blueberries, Mexican buckeye, and viburnum species

Photo: Anne Toal
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)small-flowered trees and composites and crotonalkali mallow, coastal Indian mallow, and bay cedar

Photo: Megan McCarty
Red- banded Hairstreak (Calycopis cecrops)yarrow, wild cherry, tickseed sunflower, sumac, sweet pepperbush, New Jersey tea, common milkweed, and dogbanefallen leaves of wax myrtle, dwarf sumac, staghorn sumac, and several oaks

Photo: Leppyone
Cassius Blue (Leptotes cassius)shepherd's needle, lippia, and plumbagoornamental leadwort, rattlebox, hairy milk pea, and lima bean

Photo by: credit
Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)flower nectarwoody legumes including partridge pea, mesquite, and rosary pea

Photo: Leppyone
Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas)flowers close to the ground which are open or short-tubed. These include white sweet clover, shepherd's needle, wild strawberry, winter cress, cinquefoils, asters, and others.yellow sweet clover, alfalfa, vetch, clover, wild pea, and bush clover

Photo: Biopix
Summer' Spring Azure (Celastrina ladon neglecta)flower nectarracemose dogwood, New Jersey Tea, and other plants
Whites and Sulphur Butterflies (Family Pieridae)

Photo: Bob Peterson
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)cosmos and Asiatic liliessenna and cassia

Photo: Anne Toal
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)Asiatic lilies, common dogweed, Labrador tea, asters, wild marigold, rabbitbrush, and cosmosdaisy family, dogweed, and low- growing plants in the aster family: shepherd's needle, sneezeweed, fetid marigold, and cultivated marigold

Photo: Anne Toal
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)Asiatic lilies, goldenrods, cosmos, and asterspartridge pea and wild sensitive plant

Photo: Pbonenfant
Orange-barred Sulphur (Phoebis philea)cosmos and Asiatic liliescassia or senna

Photo: Michael Rosenberg
Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)cassia species in the pea family cassia species in the pea family 

Photo: Megan McCarty
Southern Dogface (Zerene cesonia)Asiatic lilies, alfalfa, coreopsis, houstonia, and verbenaprairie clovers, indigo, clover and small-leaved plants in the pea family: such as alfalfa

Photo: Stephen Patrick
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)Asiatic lilies, scarlet monkeyflower, impatiens, passion vine, lavender, verbena, aster, and cosmosmustard (cabbage) family, nasturtium, spider flower

Photo: US Fish and Wildlife
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)Asiatic lilies, scarlet monkeyflower, lantana, and cardinal flowermembers of the mustard family and passion flower

Photo: US Fish and Wildlife
Florida White (Appias drusilla)Asiatic lilies, lantana, and eupatoriumGuiana plum

Photo: Anne Toal
Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)Asiatic lilies, saltwort, lantana, and verbenabeach cabbage, cultivated cabbage and radish, peppergrass, and nasturtium

Butterfly Garden Flowers & Plants List for the Southeast Region: Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia


In the Southeast region, the climate is marked by higher temperatures and increased levels of humidity. Northern states (such as Virginia and North Carolina) can see temperatures drop below freezing in winter months, while the southern states (such as Florida and Alabama) remain milder throughout the winter. Intense droughts are likely in the summer months. Visit your local nursery or horticultural center to determine which plants will work best for your garden.  Here are a few tips for butterfly gardening:

Tips!

  • Nectar plants should be in sunny spots to encourage the butterflies to land on them.
  • Gardens need both host and nectar plants to attract lots of butterflies. Host plants are where butterflies lay their eggs and where caterpillars grow. Host plants will be eaten by the caterpillars, so put them in a non-central location. Nectar plants will be frequented by adult butterflies.
  • If you find you're having problems with ants, grow the plant in a pot and keep water in the saucer underneath the pot. This will keep ants from climbing on the plant and attacking the butterflies.
  • Butterflies find it hard to fly when it's windy. So if you live in a windy place, provide protection from the elements with tall hedges or walls.

Above is a list of nectar and host plants that will grow well in the Southeast region. Most butterflies eat nectar from flowers, though some eat sap, dung, and other things. This list features some of the most popular plants frequented by butterflies.

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